ESS: A population-based analysis

Chan JK, Kawar NM, Shin JY, Osann K, Chen LM, Powell CB, Kapp DS.

1Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Sciences, San Francisco School of Medicine, UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, 1600 Divisadero Street, Box 1702, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA.

To determine independent prognostic factors for the survival of patients with endometrial stromal sarcoma (ESS), data were abstracted from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database of the National Cancer Institute from 1988 to 2003. Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards models were used for analyses. Of 831 women diagnosed with ESS, the median age was 52 years (range: 17-96 years). In total, 59.9% had stage I, 5.1% stage II, 14.9% stage III, and 20.1% had stage IV disease. Overall, 13.0, 36.1, and 34.7% presented with grades 1, 2, and 3, respectively. Patients with stage I-II vs III-IV disease had 5 years DSS of 89.3% vs 50.3% (P<0.001) and those with grades 1, 2, and 3 cancers had survivals of 91.4, 95.4, and 42.1% (P<0.001). In multivariate analysis, older patients, black race, advanced stage, higher grade, lack of primary surgery, and nodal metastasis were independent prognostic factors for poorer survival. In younger women (www.bjcancer.com.

Pub-Med Abstract